The Ridgeway – Overton Hill to Ogbourne St George

Typical Ridgeway path view
Typical Ridgeway path view

After a successful testing of my back finishing off the Capital Ring, it was time for a new challenge, The Ridgeway. I got up early as getting to the far end would take some time 1:30 to Ogbourne St George then another 1:30 of buses to get to Overton Hill. The final miles of the M4 and A346 was typical of the countryside I would be walking through, rolling chalk down which was looking great in the spring light, even under the overcast skies.

View from the Ridgeway
View from the Ridgeway

Parking in Ogbourne St George was easy, a sleepy village with a pub, B&B, and hotel. I had to walk about a mile to the main roan to find the bus stop, then had a 25 minute wait for X5 bus at 09:46. It was a good job i did not try for the earlier bus because there wasn’t one. The X5 never turned up but the 80 at 09:52 did, and I was soon in Marlborough. A coffee at Nero wash down a pain au raisin, while I considered my next move, the 42 passed through West Overton and departed in 30 minutes so I scrubbed the idea of a taxi to keep costs down.

I had to walk a mile to the start of the Ridgeway at Overton Hill, my FitBit had registered 3 mikes by that point. Just before the start I took a quick look at The Sanctuary a stone and wood circle. The beginning is a by way and as such is a series of white scars caused by off roaders, which luckily for me are banned from 1 October to 30 April. The path keeps to the ridge, as you would expect to, he views are distant, a.x there are barrows and stone circles to be seen all over the landscape.

Barbury Castle from the Ridgeway
Barbury Castle from the Ridgeway

There was a codd wind blowing so i did not hang about, the occasional breaking of the clouds bought welcome warming sunshine. The path was fairly quiet considering the status of the path I passed a few walkers and a couple of mountain bikers. I had a ack lunch and stopped at about mile 4 of the trail.

Ogbourne St George from the Ridgeway
Ogbourne St George from the Ridgeway

There were plenty of birds about and they were easy to spot because the land scan had few trees so they congregated in the odd hawthorn that edged the path. I spotted Twite, Skylarks, Lapwing, and Chaffinch to mention a few. The path rolled with the hills but stayed high all the time, one of the higher points was Barbury castle which is now just earth banks, I’m not sure what it looked like when it was first built. I stopped for my second sandwich after the castle on a long grass stretch, called Smeathe’s Ridge and used for gallops, it had stunning views all around.

Ogbourne St George Thatched Cottages
Ogbourne St George Thatched Cottages

The trial descend as it gets to Ogbourne St George and I left the path 200m before the bus stop I started at to take a look at the river that runs through, it was a bit of a disappointment because it was dry. It gave me a chance to see the rest of the village as the car was parked at the other end of the high street. In all I had done just over 10 miles of the path, so if I could keep that rate up and slightly more I should be able to do it in another 7 sections. Lets wait and see if I manage it.

Capital Ring – Stratford to Cyprus the final section

Stratford panorama
Stratford panorama

Easter holidays a great opportunity to get some mileage in, one problem for me though I had done something to my back and was struggling a bit. I joined a FitBit group at work and the WorkWeek Hustle spurned me to walk to work, but after two days I had a bad back, not sure if the walking caused it, possibly by walking at a faster than usual pace, either way it was painful. Getting from sitting to standing was the problem so I figured walking was better than sitting around the house all day, and got the 07:56, to Euston.

Olympic swimming venue
Olympic swimming venue

I was on the last stretch it was 8.6 miles to Woolwich ferry, which would mean I did slightly further than needed, I had started at Cyprus because it was a convenient place to start near the river crossing. At Euston I opted for Northern then Central line to Stratford. It was almost impossible to get the other side of the railway from the Olympic park all paths under were blocked, I ended up taking a mile and a half detour and even then has to climb three fences.

The route follows the Jubilee Greenway another path I have considered doing, quite short but right in the middle of London, it even goes past Buckingham palace. The section I was seemed to be a disused railway. I found out it was a sewer and every so often you get a whiff of it. I left the Greenway and walled through a housing estate, where I missed a turn but was soon back on track and in Becton Park, where I saw a mistle thrush fly up into a tree, as I walked past I realised it was at the top of the short trunk sitting on a nest.

Victorian pump station seen from the Jubilee Greenway
Victorian pump station seen from the Jubilee Greenway

It wasn’t long before I got to Cyprus station where i had started the Ring, it had been a short walk around 7 miles. I spent the rest of my day wandering along south Bank. I started at Bank and walked down the north side  until millenium bridge. Whilst cross the bridge I spotted someone who was familiar selling the worlds smallest kites, it was Julian McDonnell who has a Youtube channel that I subscribe to, Fun London Guides – Julian McDonnell Films. His video are always interesting showing the more quirky side of London. One video in particular I enjoyed is about his attempt to get to Pitcairn island a very difficult place to get to indeed and quite an adventure, check it out for yourself : Take Me To Pitcairn – Full Documentary  Any way we chatted for a few minutes, he seemed like a nice guy, then I carried on down Southbank and stopped for my first Burrito outside the national Film Theatre.

Cyprus Station DLR
Cyprus Station DLR

From there I headed up through Trafalgar Square where they were reenacting Jesus rising from the dead. I dropped into Foyles but did not purchase any books. Carrying on I walked up Tottenham Court road where it seems all the electronics shops had been replaced by shops i have no interest in, a sad state of affairs. Final I passed by by Euston road and used the back road to the station so I could check out Callumet camera shop, no bargains or whoops moments today though.

Capital Ring – Boston Manor to Hendon Central

Rubbish on Horseden Hill
Rubbish on Horseden Hill

Keen to get back on the Capital Ring after two weekends off due to a weeks holiday in Kent, I was up early, on the 07:46 Metropolitan train from Amersham, destination Boston Manor. The weather was a bit grey with a chill in the air but the forecasters promised sunny with showers later on. The journey to Boston Manor was a bit tedious as twice i would have to travel up a branch line only to have to reverse to go a couple of stops up another branch. Annoyingly I missed a connection at Harrow-on-the-Hill so waster 12 minutes.

At Rayners Lane I crossed platforms to get the Piccadilly line, interestingly the trains seemed really low, and there was a step down to the train, i guess the trains have to go in smaller tunnels, and the Rayners Lane platform is slightly higher than most, turns out the all the Piccadilly trains are low. I changed again at Acton Town and got on a Heathrow train, full of people and their luggage, it always makes me wonder where they are all flying off to.

Harrow on the Hill high Street
Harrow on the Hill high Street

The path follows the river Brent for a while passing factories and through a couple of golf courses. It all becomes a bit urban at Greenfield where a main road and railway needs to be crossed. I took the opportunity at Westway Cross retail park to grab a coffee which i drank outside in the sun, i also eat a pain au raisin that i had purchased a at Local Sainsbury earlier.

Horseden hill was a hard slog and when I eventually go to the top to enjoy the view it was somewhat spoilt by the rubbish left behind bu some people who had picnicked there. Down the other side of the hill and on the flat I was passing through what was clearly a very old Oak wood, judging by the size of the trees.

Harrow School Building
Harrow School Building

Next up was Harrow when I walked up the high street, which was almost deserted, I guess it was the school holidays. I made the security guard a bit twitchy by stopping to take photographs of the historic buildings. I was quite tired by this time and the walk to the edges of Wembley was a challenge with not much to see.

In a moment of madness I had decided at this point to see if I could do a long day as I had been just making the 10 miles on some of the previous days, target changed from Wembley Park to Hendon Central. I got to Brent Reservoir and had a longish break to build up my strength for the next few miles. It was a pleasant place to stop I could watch the boats in a sailing race whilst enjoying the warm sun.

The Windermere Pub Kenton
The Windermere Pub Kenton

I really had had enough by the time I got to Hendon Central, which was quite familiar as I would sometimes pass down the road when I have occasionally driven into London. Looking at Google maps it the journey bac was going to be a ball ache. I consider a taxi to a Metropolitan tube station but in the end waited for an 83 bus, which took me to Wembley Park, ironic that I had already walked past it.

I had a 30 minute wait for the next Amersham train, I guess I had just missed one. The platform was crowded by families with small children dressed up as princes and princesses it turns out that Disney on Ice was at the Arena. I was glad to get back to Amersham but still had a chore to do get dinner from Waitrose in Chesham.

 

Capital Ring – Wimbledon to Hanwell

I had been looking forward​ to this section, finally I would be onto a more pleasant section, Wimbledon to Hanwelk would involve two trenches of parkland and two stretches next to water. The parklands are Wimbledon Common where i would be on the look out for Wombles, and Richmond Park where i might spot some deer an other wildlife. At Richmond i would be back next to the Thames and then follow the river Brent. All that sounds much more interesting than the walk so far, although it started to improve on the last stretch.

The weather promised to be cloudy but bright and unseasonally warm, potentially 16 degrees. I consulted Google maps, and there was not much between car and train when i took into account total time as Hanwelk is a bit out of the way, and difficult to get to Wimbledon from. I opted for the train as it would allow me to be more flexible.

I had got a cramp as i stretched when i woke up and my calf muscle was sore and torn, i thought it would ruin my day but i reckoned the walking would do it good.

I got a free parking space but just missed the 08:01, but the fast 08:11 was soon whisking me away to Euston. I went wrong at Earle’s court and has to double back as i got the train going down the Richmond rather than Wimbledon branch, but lost less than 10 minutes. At Southfields I then managed to walk a couple of hundred yards in the wrong direction.

It was not long before I got to Wimbledon Common, after passing the car park full of Chelsea tractors I was soon in woods and fields, and immediately spotted a Goldcrest and mistle thrush. The air temperature was high enough for me to walk with just a t-shirt. Eventually I came to a road which is the border between Wimbledon Common and Richmond Park, interestingly it had a separate crossing g for horses riders who were everywhere. The deer in the park were obviously thriving, there were notices about the cull which has just finished.

Richmond Park is distinctly different in terms of habit, I guess the deer have some influence over that. Again there were plenty of Londoners make the most of the open space and weather. The path is straight forward straight then a 45 degree turn which I missed so walked the long way around an enclosed nature reserve. On the far end there is a car park with a coffee shop which I made use of, it was time for a rest.

There is a lovely meadow after you drop down from Richmond park called Petersham I’m guessing it is not built on due to flooding and I bet is has some rare species on it. The other side of the meadow I hit the Thames but on the other side of river from where I had walked the Thames Path. Soon I was in Richmond, near the bridge there was some boat building and repairing going on in the sun. There was a prty atmosphere with alll the Rugby fans gathering outside the pubs for a beer and some lunch before the match later on.

Whilst stood around taking in the atmosphere a guy walked past he looked professional and had a TShirt on with a website http://richardwalkslondon.com/ on investigation Richard McChesney is a serious walker and has plans to set a record for the first non-stop walk around the M25, he reckons it will take 48 hours, and for the whole time is is not allowed to not be on his feet. I would struggle to do 48 hours staying awake let alone havng to stay on my feet and walk.

At Isleworth i had to take another detour when builders had blocked a section of the river path. I joined the river again at a pub called Town Wharf, where i had  a conversation with a local at the bar turns out he has an interesting job, locksmith at the British Museum. I was keen to sit down so had to make my excuses, i hope i did not offend. The jumbo fish finger sandwich went down a treat on the Riverside terrace. I was sat next to a bunch of Scotland supports who thought they were going to beat England at Twickenham!

Eventually you leave the Thames for the Brent, i realised that getting to Hanwell and then getting home for the Rugby would be a challenge so i bailed out at Boston Manor station. Interestingly the first stop was Northfield which was an interesting balance seeing as i started at Southfields. At Leicester Square there was lots of chanting as more Arsenal supporters got on and supporters of another team were on the platform.

I comfortably made the 15:54 from Euston but that would mean missing most of the first half of the rugby. I got the BBC radio app loaded and got most of it when there was a signal.

Capital Ring – Penge to Wimbledon

I fell out of love with the Capital Ring I think because I started it at a time when the days were short, and the first few legs were very urban and not very inspiring. I have been doing some more local outings which made a change. I liked the idea of doing walks with an overall aim or purpose, so I took a look at the map and determined that one more leg and I would be back into a more interesting part which would last for most of the rest of it.

I checked the weather and determined that Saturday was the right day, Sunday promised rain all day. I was up early and aiming for the 08:11 from Berkhamsted. It looked like things were going well, I got the last free parking space at the station, then realised that I would make the 08:01, I got my ticket and had time to get a coffee as the train arrived, I walked out of the coffee shop as the train doors opened.

Three generations of males joined me at the table I had on the train, boy younger than 10, father and grandfather, they were off to Manchester to watch Bournemouth play Manchester United. I commented that Bournemouth did not sound like they belonged in the Premier division, apparently a few years back they had collection buckets going round the stadium to keep the club going.

The start took me up Crystal Palace hill qhuch was the start of a long section high which descended and ascended often. After a particularly steep climb I came Streatham Common where a handy community cafe served me a cortado and a pain au raisin. I rested for a while taking pleasure in watching all the joggers that spring had bought out many of them having to break for bro a walk, probably due to lack of practice over the winter months.

The path crosses quite a few commons some of them divided by roads. I passed through Streatham and Balham before eventually reaching the edge of Wimbledon, where the houses got grandeur. Wimbledon was full of more joggers and appropriately people playing tennis. The weather was reasonable qarmand sunny perfect weather for getting out of the house.

I decided to go to Southfields station to to ensure I had done more than 10 miles, luckily for me there was a chip shop just opposite the tube entrance so I stopped for some and was given a high portion I only managed half of. The journey back was via Victoria and Euston. I was back in Berkhamsted before 16:00.

Local walk – Hughenden Manor to Prince’s Risborough

I had a lie in after my late night at the Buckland Church film night. A monthly event where a film is screened a and supper servered during an interval. Last night’s film was Les Femmes did Sixieme Etage, a French film set early sixties about Spanish maids working for Parisian households. The following on was quite good and a bit of a comedy. They also serve drinks and I had a couple of beers during the film, it is an unusual thing to be doing in a church watching a film and drinking. The only down side was the pews are not very comfortable.

Anyway I digress, I wax my up early so I opted for a local walk, and after some poring over mas I decided to get a bus from Princes Risborough to Hughenden and then find a route back via Speen. I would pass some of the places from my walk the Sunday before. I parked up and walked into the town centre, luckily for me the bus was running late.

I was soon at the Hughenden stop but it had started to rain and being a cold day I did not fancy getting wet and cold. Luckily it was a short walk to the National Trust cafe where a lingered over a coffee, waiting for the rain to stop. The BBC weather app suggested it would pass over between 12:00 and 13:00, I had my fingers crossed. I noticed out of a window that the corner of a table umbrella was dripping quite fast so I timed 50 drips to estimate the rain fall rate, a second count of 50 drips a while later took twice as long so I decided that it was safe enough to venture out again.

I was on familiar ground for a while then turned off the path from the week before to follow a good path with little mud for a couple of miles, before reaching Walters Ash which is where RAF High Wycombe is located, I paused at the entrance to the officers mess which prompted the guard to come out of his hut. Electronics c signs were advertising events happening and how to web surf safely at Christmas.

I crossed the road and was soon back to foot paths, as I left the vilkage the path boatdered a school playing field all that was left of the snow were large snowballs and melting snowmen.

My next stop was Speen where I had vaguely planned but the King William IV was shut so I settled for a packet of crisps and a Chelsea bun from the village shop which was just about to close for the day, but not before the kind lady told me the the story about the now closed pub. I had lunchand in a bus shelter, as it had the only dry seat I could find, however the day was finally getting brighter.

The final few miles were familiar to me from previous walks and eventually I got to the Whiteleaf car park above Prince’s Risborough. I followed a footpath which ran parallel to Kop Hill famous for its hill climb. I was tired by that point probably because of the cold weather, so did not linger too long BT did get a reasonable shot of the sunset.

I picked up a couple of 2.7℅ beers from Mark’s and Spencer when changed I have found to be very flavoursome.

Capital Ring – Falconwood to Penge East

Early start at Berkhamsted
Early start at Berkhamsted

Late night Boxing Day party I thought would have dampened my enthusiasm before a walk, but I got to bed at a later but reasonable hour, and felt refreshed rather than hung over. A quick breakfast of left over Christmas food, hot cross buns, and a coffee and I was set to get the 08:53 from Berkhamsted. There were lads of free parking spaces, but I managed to miss the 08:46 while I got my ticket, annoying especially as the coffee shop was shut. I had time to spare so headed into Berkhamsted town to see if data could find a coffee shop open. I thought I was out that for luck but then noticed that Love Food Dining was open, they sold take away coffee and dam fine coffee in my opinion.

Eltham Palace water supply
Eltham Palace water supply

The train was packed but I found a seat. It was a frosty start to the day, and quite cold at -1 degrees C, but the weather forecast was a fine day, and with the sun almost as low as it get the photo opportunities were there for the taking. The train was delayed a little bit when we were held waiting for a signal outside Euston.

The transit to Falconwood was via the Victoria line to Victoria then a Southeastern train to my destination. The train was a bit slow and stopped for what seemed like every station, but eventually I got there. I was planning about 10 miles for the day, and was hoping I might get get to a camera shop at Euston on my way home to buy a new lens to replace my mid zoom which had finally packed in after over 10 years of service. I was going to invest in a 16-35mm f4.0 L IS USM.

Extreme Christmas
Extreme Christmas

En route to Waltham I passed through yet another Leafy London Suburb with lovely houses. I passed by Eltham Palace which is run by National Heritage. It was a strange building from the outside, some of it clearly less than 100 years old, but it has a mixture of parts that suggested that there had been some sort of building there for a very long time. It also had a moat.

On the other side of the track things were a bit more run down and I spent a couple of miles waking along paths between by run down housing estates, however I got great views as of Docklands from the slightly elevated path.

Cyclo-cross rider at Beckenham Park
Cyclo-cross rider at Beckenham Park

At Downham high street I looked for a cafe but could not find one that looked worth trying. Eventually I came across a McDonald’s drive thru, so stopped for a filet-o-fish and some chips washed down with a coffee. It is an interesting process these days, rather than talk to someone you use a large, 40 inch touch screen to order and pay then your food is delivered, although I realised once I was tucking in that you could order in the traditional way at the counter.

Things got a bit rural for a while as I passed through Beckenham Park, there was a cyclo cross competition going on, so I paused for a while and took some shots of the action. I carried on and things were pretty urban for the rest of the section with ntil I got to Penge East. As I approached I could see the Crystal Palace aerial beckoning in the distance.

Kent County Cricket Club
Kent County Cricket Club

I had a bit of a wait for the next train to Victoria again a bit busy but it is easy for one person to find a seat. The connections went well and at Euston I had a 30 minute wait for the next train, and with a Calumet (photographic shop) just around the block it seemed rude not to pop in and have a look. As luck would have it they has the lens and in stock and it did not take long to negotiate a better price than those list, I was a few hundred pounds lighter. Probably the most expensive wait for a train I have ever had.

I grabbed the rear most carriage to ensure easy access to the exit at Berkhamsted Station. I had got be another 10 miles of the Capital Ring and has a new lens, which will be taking pictures for this blog in the very near future.

Capital Ring – Cyprus to Falconwood

University of East London
University of East London

Having finished the London Loop I needed a new challenge, I thought I would give the Capital Ring a go. the Ring is a whisker over half the distance of the London Loop at 78 miles which breaks down into 6 or 7 stretches, of reasonable length. It is another route around London but closer to the centre, and I hoped would be a bit more urban than The Loop.

We finished work on Wednesday the 21st so I thought I would get my first section done on my first day off. Trouble is it is a week day so travel would be more expensive. I knew the first off peak train from Berkhamsted was the 09:31 so I aimed for that. I was not too sure of the best option so went to the ticket office, it turns out that my Railcard was only valid on trains after 10:00 so I opted for the £20 one without the Railcard discount. I had to be on a train back before 16:49 which would suit me fine.

John Burns Woolwich ferry
John Burns Woolwich ferry

I had puzzled over where to start, my book and early Xmas present from Helen started at Woolwich and went clockwise, and from experience I knew following book was best done on the same direction. I could however start anywhere on the Ring and just loop back to the beginning of the book as necessary, so I went to bed thinking somewhere north of London would be best given the train restrictions. One final look at the map in the morning and I changed my mind, the route passes close to a DLR station just north of Woolwich ferry so I decided to start there, just a mile from the start of the book, and a chance to use the tunnel, as when I did the Thames Path I had used the ferry.

The train was on time and empty at Berkhamsted, but by the time we got to Euston most seats were taken. The weather was forecast as sunny but there was a most about, which I hoped would make for good photos. The northern line took me to Bank the I got on the DLR to West Ferry then changed to the Becton line for the final leg to Cyprus. I had a front row on the train and with no driver’s cabin you get great views of Docklands as we passed through.

Boat on the Thames
Boat on the Thames

I soon reached Gallions Point, which at first glance looks like it is spelt wrong but when I checked on Wikipedia it all made sense, “Gallions Reach is a stretch of the River Thames between Woolwich and Thamesmead. There are various locations on both sides of the river named after Gallions Reach. The area is named for the Galyons, a 14th-century family who owned property along this stretch of the river.”

At Woolwich ferry I chose the tunnel rather than the ferry which I used when I did the Thames Path, deep and long is as much as I have to say about it. The getting the modern bit wood panelled lift back up to the surface is worth the ride and save some energy. I was still on familiar ground as the path again follows the Thames Path, but after  a mile I took a left through Marion Wilson animal park where in the middle is a very secure couple of fenced areas containing ducks and chickens on one side of the path and deer, with antlers, on the other. I think it was run by Greenwich council for children to experience where children can experience a kind of farm like environment.

Shooters Hill
Shooters Hill

I crossed a busy road BT was soon in another ark this time Charlton Park which contains Charlton hall a grand Elizabethan, I think, building. I came across auch needed WC and a great little cafe where I had a cheese sandwich and a coffee for lunch. 

The next significant milestone was Shooters Hill in Greenwich borough. The path was in the woods but not at all muddy. It was however hilly. I passed a castle then a cafe both at the top of hills. I was glad of the final descent.

At Shepperdleas Woods I had had enough and decided that Falconwood station on the South Eastern Railway line, to Charing Cross, was the place to finish off. I had a two minute wait, for the relatively busy train but I found a seat without any trouble.

I made short shrift if my London transit by getting off at London Bridge and walking to the Northern Line, I got to Euston with 4 minutes to spare for the 16:34, which was well within the time cut off for my off peak ticket. I think I am going to enjoy the Capital Ring.

London Loop – Harold’s Wood to Purfleet the final leg

Thames barges in the mist
Thames barges in the mist

I kept waking up in the night, possibly because I knew I wanted to get up early to make sure I finished off LOOP, by getting the 07:49, however I was wide awake at 05:55 so I got up and was parked up at Berkhamsted with 20 minutes to get a ticket and coffee before the 06:49. I had no excuse to not finish. Puccino’s was open that early which was a relief, apparently they had a lie in and opened at 06:00 instead of their usual 05:00!

The train was on time and there were plenty of seats I managed to get a seat with a table to myself. Quite a few people got on at Watford at 07:03 my theory was that there first train pad there hours is always slightly busier than others?

Once again Google maps came to the rescue, I checked the best route from Euston and as I got to the southbound Northern line platform the train arrived, then after walking from Moorgate to Liverpool street the next train to Harold’s Wood was to depart in 4 minutes. I was back on the walk at 08:23 it was very foggy so navigation was going to b re a challenge.

Arty misty ThamesI was in familiar territory as I walked a short action I had walked the week before, I left the built up area and entered Harold’s Wood park there were just a few dog walkers and joggers about. Visibility was down to about 70m. At the end of the wood I walked along a B road to get across the A127, or better known as the Southend Arterial Road.

Arty misty ThamesI again was in familiar ground as I approached Upminster and passed the car park where I had left the car the week vefore, the route was again urban for a while, until we hit Ingrebourne valley at Hacton parkway. I would be in the country and wildlife areas for quite a few miles, and had not taken the opportunity to get a coffee and some water as it would have meant a detour. I thought I may have made a mistake but then I came across Ingrebourne Valley Visitor Centre, run by the Essex Wildlife Trust, in Hornchurch Country Park. The café was a good one as many of the wildlife centres gave these days. I was not impressed with the stale scone but the butter covered that up and the coffee was good. I had a table overlooking the reserve and it’s reed bed but these was not much chance of sightings because they were all lost in the mist. I did however if and time to browse a book called The East End Then and Now, a thick book with all sorts of stories and pictures if the East End.

Lighthouse on the Thames
Lighthouse on the Thames

On the way out I noticed a small exhibition about the role of the area during  WWII there was some Spitfire action around there involving the RAF. I also noticed a bird box camera display there was a squirrel asleep in the Tawny Owl nesting box! As I walked the remainder of the reserve I noticed pill boxes and gun emplacements.

I’ve learnt with all the walking this year that the tortoise normally wins, walk at a reasonable pace don’t try to rush, as that just results in sore things and blisters. At a good pace, around 3 mph, I ultimately am able to walk further than if I try to sprint.

As I approached Rainham there were a couple of super stores ans the photo place for garden atorage, Rainham Sheds. Evidence that I was nearing the Thames ce in the form notifications of Ferry Lane, which actually lead to the railway station where I crossed over on a pedestrian walkway. There was no evidence of a ferry to be seen, especially in the mist.

At the Thames edge I spotted waders, Godwits, Redshank, and Curlews amongst the ticks. I could hear boats but could not see them. A regular siren called out six times about once a minute, it was warning of a  jetty I think, for boats offloading rubbish for the landfill. The route followed the Thames edge and there Was a sign posts every 200m counting down the distance to the finish at Purfleet, they started at about 4km.

Purfleet Magazine
Purfleet Magazine

There was not much to see what with industrial estate, and landfill, but I did pass Coldharbour lighthouse a light on a red tower about 10m high. I saw over Twenty goldfinch on a fence, and surprisingly a Stonechat amongst them. My feet were starting to get a bit sore at 13miles but I carried on rather because I knew Rainham RSPB was close and a sandwich in the very strange modern visitor centre was beckoning. I got chatting to the RSPB man who told me that there was a Cattle Egret, two Short-Eared Owls, and some Avocets out on the reserve, it was tempting to go and take a look but they were all in the far side if the reserve, and I had some walking still left to do and in any case had left my membership card at home. Reluctantly I pulled myself out of the comfy armchair and got back on the LOOP.

It was not far, just a mile, to Purfleet station a train arrived but I was determined to find a plaque indicating the end of the LOOP so I let it go while I searched for the plaque. It turns out there is not one, or one that I could find anyway. So I sat on platform one and waited 25 minutes for the 14:56 back to central London. Google gave me a choice of routes I decided to get off at Barking and get on the Hammersmith and City all the way through to Euston. If anything the mist was even thickerbas the light faded. It looked like I would make the 16:24 from Euston, I was glad I had got up early l, it would have been proper dark if I has left an hour later.

The end of the London Loop Purfleet Station
The end of the London Loop Purfleet Station

Not sure if I missed the connection or got there early but Google suggested the district line when I check at Barking, it was due in 1 minute. At West Ham Google had me get off and wait for the Hammersmith and City to shave a minute of the journey. I noticed that the temperature had dropped significantly as waited briefly on the same platform I had got off at. No further suggested changes emerged. I actually made the 16:05 and had time to grab a hit chocolate, before getting on the train, which had changed platforms since it was announced on the departures board.

I really enjoyed the London LOOP and was surprised at how rural it was. One of the aspects I really liked was the adventure if getting g to and from parts of London by public transport. My next challenge will be the Capital Ring which I will attempt to get a good chunk of it done over the Christmas break. I reckon at 78 miles it should be doable in 6 sections of 13 miles.

I grabbed a ready meal from Waitrose on the way home and Helen and I planned to spend the evening in front of the TV, we thought we would give Westworld a go.

London Loop – Chigwell to Harold’s Wood

Loop view
Loop view

Saturday it rained all day so I skipped the usual walk and we headed for the cinema to see Snowden, which was good, not too technical that Helen enjoyed it too despite her thinking it might not be a good film because it was about computers. Sunday on the other hand was blue skies and a tad cold, excellent walking conditions. Getting to where I left off was going to be a challenge, I was once again on the opposite end of the LOOP from where I live.

I decided to drive to Upminster as I could het there in under an hour’s then could use the tube to get back to Chigwell where I had left off the week before.T he drive involved the M25 until the last junction before the Dartford tunnel, the Southend Arterial Road for a few miles to Monster where I parked in a car park that was free on a Sunday, and on the LOOP route, which I followed to Upminster Bridge station. A train was waiting for me on the platform. Passing through Hornchurch, Barking, West Ham, and Bow Road I changed at Mile End to get on the Central Line, to Chigwell.

Interesting stations on the Central Line included Gants Hill, Fairlop and Grange Hill. Not sure of the 80’s kids TV programme was filmed at it’s namesake? I had to change when the train terminated at Hainault. I had a 15 minute wait so would probably only start walking at 11:20 it was going to be a challenge to get the planned 15 miles done before it for dark. the Woodford twain was advertised on platform 2 but then arrived on 1 so there was a mad rush to change platforms, I just made it as the doors closed!

Loop view
Loop view

About a couple of miles in a guy called Dave caught up with me and I enquired whether he was walking the LOOP, it turns out he was. We chatted for a couple of miles, he had an interesting job. He was doing a PhD in the physics of solar weather, and prediction of solar flares. His pace was just slightly faster than my usual place, and at the first hill I bid him fair well. Soon I was the other side of Hainault Forest Country Park.

So far the going had been muddy which would turn out the be the theme for ther day as the path crossed lots of fields. There did not seem to be a way to stop the mud sticking to my boots. The next country park would be Havering Country Park, but I don’t remember much of it as I’m sure I was getting a cold and sore throat, which was distracting me. I passed through Chigwell Row Wood, and walked past Ye Olde Kings Head which I could not figure out whether it was still a pub, a private home or a curry house. It turns out it was an trendy restaurant where all the stars eat including Alan Sugar and Tamara Ecclestone, the website is here http://sheeshrestaurant.co.uk/

After Foxburrow Wood and walking through a nondescript housing estate I decided to bail out at Harold’s Wood station, I had had enough. I found the bus stop and waited 20 minutes for the 256 to Hornchurch High Street, then another 15 minutes walk (0.7 miles) to the car. The journey back was fine as the traffic was OK. Helen had a honey and lemon waiting for me when I got home and had made tea, perfect!